Category Archives: Haematology

Tip 18: blood pressure

As a rough guide, the 5th centile mean arterial blood pressure (mmHg) of a preterm infant is equal to the gestational age in weeks. The 50th centile is +10mmHg. The 95th centile is another +10mmHg. Reference: Rennie & Roberton’s Textbook … Continue reading

Posted in Haematology | Leave a comment

Tip 4: neutropenia

Neutropenia is often defined as <1.1 x 109/L. The incidence increases with decreasing birth weight, seen in 3% term infants weighing >2500g and up to 38% of those weighing <1000g. Reference: Nittala, S., Subbarao, G. C., & Maheshwari, A. (2012). Evaluation … Continue reading

Posted in Haematology, Infection, Prematurity | Leave a comment

Tip 1: anaemia

The haemoglobin nadir for term babies is at 8 – 12/52 age. External link: anaemia of prematurity (eMedicine) (updated 2016)

Posted in Haematology | Leave a comment

Tip 216: exchange transfusion 2

Exchange transfusions should always be double-volume (160–200 mL/kg). This removes around 90% of neonatal red cells and 50% of bilirubin. Reference: United Kingdom Blood Services (2013). Guidelines for the Blood Transfusion Services in the United Kingdom. 8th Edition. TSO: Norwich. Previously published: 28/01/15

Posted in Haematology | Leave a comment

Tip 215: exchange transfusion

A bilirubin above the exchange transfusion line should be considered a medical emergency. An exchange transfusion involves removing aliquots of patient blood and replacing with donor blood in order to remove bilirubin and antibodies in isoimmune disease. It takes time to … Continue reading

Posted in Haematology | Leave a comment

Tip 110: polycythaemia 2

Risk factors for polycythaemia include: IUGR Infant of diabetic mother Twin-to-twin transfusion recipient Delayed cord clamping Reference: Rennie & Roberton’s Textbook of Neonatology, 5th Ed, 2005. London: Churchill. Previously published: 14/05/14, 01/05/15

Posted in Haematology | Leave a comment

Tip 107: polycythaemia

Polycythaemia (a venous haematocrit above 0.65) is relatively common. Most babies are asymptomatic, though a small proportion of babies develop clinical signs related to hyperviscosity, which include: Plethora Jaundice Lethargy Poor suck and feeding Irritability Tachypnoea and tachycardia Hypoglycaemia A … Continue reading

Posted in Haematology | Leave a comment